3D Pool: Billiards & Snooker

3D Pool: Billiards & Snooker

It’s pool, what should I know? The game is pool, in the most basic sense of the word. Sound is there, although I wouldn’t say the balls have any real difference in sound which is a shame because different velocities should sound different. The four game modes are 8 ball, 9 ball, 10 ball and snooker and they’re fine, but I would have liked the ability to customize my game with things like calling my shots or using last pocket. The graphics are as basic as the rest of the game. Shadows are nice but everything else is just sort of there. The music and voice acting are reptetive and minimal. The controls are easy enough to master but are not re-bindable. In terms of variety, there are a few tables (reskins), a few different ball sets (also reskins) and 10 opponents of varying capabilities. Oh and you can play local multiplayer. Sounds like you don’t like it very much It’s not that I don’t like the game. It’s enjoyable, and for the cost you get what you pay for: a basic iteration of pool. The problem is with games like Pool Nation or even Sport Bar VR, I can’t think of a good reason to pick this game up unless it’s just to spend an hour or so playing pool and never touching it again. So what should they have done instead? In my humble opinion, trading cards and achievements at a minimum. That would have made the price tag a little easier to handle. Unlockable balls, tables, cues and foes would have been a great addition. A better audio system would...
Mini Metro

Mini Metro

Mini metro is one of those games, if you haven’t played it you probably own it. Either through bundles or steam sales, the game has a huge audience and on the surface it’s understandable why one might overlook it. Any single screenshot looks plain with wide light swaths cut through by a few colorful lines. But what those things represent is so much more and adds up to something very much worth your time. In Mini Metro, you’ll start with three stations that need to be connected. Each station is represented by a shape, most commonly a square, circle, or triangle but also diamonds and stars. Passengers are darker icons that need to be delivered to other stations, as shown by [b]their[/b] shapes (they use the same shapes as the stations).   You connect your stations by drawing a line between them. The various colors represent a ‘track’, a path the train will follow. So you decide which stations connect and how. If a passenger wants to get to a station that isn’t directly on their line, they will be dropped off at a connecting station and transfer to another line.   The challenge comes when new stations pop up. If you don’t have a line free, you’ll need to attach it to an existing line, which places a greater strain for trains on that track. It’s an additional stop, an additional spot to pick people up from or deliver them to and it means passengers have a longer wait.   Every seven days you get an upgrade, usually in the form of a new train and a choice...
Legendary: The Box

Legendary: The Box

I recall when the game Legendary (alternative title, “Legendary: The Box”), I was quite excited. A first person shooter set in modern day but with the titular pandora’s box having been opened, giving us gargoyles, griffons and other mythical creatures to destroy. The game itself does not live up to my expectations about what that premise could be but it does make for a shorter and sloppily told first person shooter.   Firstly, the game is quite obviously a port. Auto-saves and graphical options that are barely there show little work went into this game to make it a dedicated for-PC option. However, with a title this old it and a studio as small as they were at the time (they’ve since shut down after laying off their staff), it’s a minor annoyance at best.   The gunplay itself isn’t nearly as tactical nor as interesting as other shooters and coming from a guy who doesn’t really get how ‘realistic’ guns should be, that’s a problem. Most of the guns feel quite similar, the enemies (of which there are only a handful, and most of them are human) except for the bosses have passable AI and the multiplayer is now dead (thanks Gamespy!).   So why would someone want to play this game? Well, because they own it. The game can be purchased relatively cheap on Steam during sales. For a buck or two, you get about 8 hours of really poorly told story. The voice acting is stiff, animations are rough and the cut scenes (paintings that barely move) are disinteresting. But 8 hours of entertainment for a...
The Wolf Among Us

The Wolf Among Us

Once again, it’s time for a Telltale game. This time we delve into the noir setting of the DC comics / Vertigo comic series Fables. The game is created as a prequel to the comics and was one of the more well received Telltale games they’ve produced.   So basically we’re looking at more of the same: same controls, same quick time event, different set of filters over the same quality artwork, same menu options, and the same level of quality for audio. Now none of that is bad, as the developers are just doing what they do best: focusing on telling an interesting story with a cast of interesting characters and I’d say for the most part they were successful.   So we’re brought into the world of Fables where the characters of fairy tales, legends, myths, and other stories all end up living in New York in their own little area. You have to pay witches to glamour you to look human or you have to go upstate to ‘The Farm’ where characters who can’t afford a glamour or who a glamour wouldn’t work on (like giants) go. Our characters is the big bad wolf himself, Bigby and a good chunk of your time will also be spent with Snow White while they unravel a murder mystery involving a beheaded prostitute and end up poking their noses into the personal lives of everyone they meet.   Across five chapters, this ends up working pretty well. The pacing is particularly excellent to the point I never felt I was floundering. Investigating people when you have clues or don’t...
The Walking Dead Season 2

The Walking Dead Season 2

The first season of “The Walking Dead” was a revolution for Telltale Games. Taking a beloved licence and marrying it with a more cinematic way of telling a story, many users were drawn to it. This was in heavy contrast to the lighter licences and more game play heavy games that came before their earlier cinematic attempts like Jurassic Park. Some complaints were tied to the first season, mostly in a lack of actual choice. Often you would be presented with a few options and no matter which you decided upon, the result was preordained but I actually enjoyed this method of choice as the decision you made was remembered by the other characters and would change how they acted towards your character. All the while you had a surrogate daughter in the character of Clementine, the new protagonist of the series.   If you’re new to this type of game, it’s very similar to the “Choose Your Own Adventure” series of books. Watching a bit of story, you’ll be presented with dialog choices. These could range from a simple “who gets this candy bar” to life and death split second moments of choice. Season 2 continues this tradition, with a new cast of characters. Characters I found far more compelling and well written when compared to the first game. Clem certainly feels like she’s grown up since the end of the first season and the story never feels tied down to the comic books from which it is based upon. Oh and neither of the games have anything to do with the television series so there is no...