Sine Mora

Sine Mora

The child of so many arcade games, Sine Mora piqued my interest upon release. I enjoyed it so much I bought copies for friends since it was so cheap. And now, I can finally say I’ve beaten it. If you’re looking for a good side scrolling shoot-em-up game, then look no further than Sine Mora.   Like other games in the genre, you sit on the left, the game auto-scrolls and everything is set in a horizontal perspective. What sets Sine Mora apart is that it still has the challenge of the arcade by giving you very strict time limits on how long you have to accomplish tasks. To add to your timer, you defeat foes and if they hit you (and remember, this is a bullet-hell type shoot-em-up game, so there are LOTS of particles going on at all times) your time goes down.   The story is fine, although I can’t say that I was playing it to find out what happened next. The cast of furries (which seems to be a theme this week) is fine, the voice acting is excellent as the developers made up languages for the game (Correction: they use hungarian. Apologies for that inaccuracy). I’m sure that made localization much easier. The bosses are gigantic and the variety in game types is exactly what you’d expect (story, arcade, time trials, boss battles and so on). Honestly the game is fantastic and requires little introduction. If you like the genre, you’ll certainly enjoy Sine Mora and if you don’t, it won’t change your...
Inside

Inside

From the creators of Limbo come another atmospheric game, simple to play and thick with aesthetic. The game features no HUD, minimal music, excellent sound and well designed puzzles. Everything feels very carefully placed and integrated, as though this world is being filmed and is not constructed for a video game. The auto-save system works quite well, as you’ll probably die horribly more than a few times.   One problem with most platform / puzzle games is always the one or two nefarious puzzles that always seem to require a walk through or tip to complete. None of the puzzles were unsolvable in this game, with each one being challenging but not impossible. This was a highlight for me as I felt like I was progressing along my own path, and not simply following the path of someone else.   I highly recommend playing the game. It has atmosphere, tension and a story that will leave an impression on you. Then, if you don’t want to do it yourself, go look at the secret ending online. And then read all the theories about what the story is and what it means. Even if I wasn’t telling you to do all this, you would be doing it...
Super Hot

Super Hot

In a world where shooters are a dime a dozen and unity engine games aren’t always synonymous with quality, it’s nice to have a developer like this put some real time and effort into fine tuning every single aspect of their game until you feel like it’s all one system. If you’re looking for a game where you feel like Neo, you’ve found it.   Super Hot is more puzzle game than action game, where you need to clear a smallish level of all foes before you’re allowed to progress to the next. The core mechanic of the game is that time does not progress unless you move. Well it does but very very slowly, with everything around you happening as though the world is filled with molasses. Of course the moment you start walking or aiming, that all goes away and panic sets in as bullets whiz by your head.   I won’t go into the story, as it’s best to go in blind, but it is something that will likely stick with you after you’re done. The main story is only an hour or two long, but there’s plenty to do in free play, in challenges and just exploring everything the game has to offer. Even if the game isn’t on a sale, it’s certainly worth the full price of admission for all this...
Freedom Planet

Freedom Planet

When I was a kid, I had an NES. When the SNES and Genesis rolled around, I was not privileged enough to get one. That was fine, I had our spanking new Pentium 75 PC! But the PC was lacking in several areas, most notably platform games. While my friends enjoyed Mario World, Sonic or Rystar (try it, it’s a great game), I managed with Cosmo’s Cosmic Adventure and Jetpack. Not bad games, but they lacked spark. Freedom Planet is a gift to my younger self and it’s a great gift.   Playing a young ‘dragon’ (she doesn’t look like any dragon I’ve ever seen) Sash Lilac, you team up with your semi-sapphic reptilian friend Carol Tea to be adventurers of sorts. You’re drawn up into a huge conflict that might even span the galaxy, by taking down a crashed warlord who wants to destroy the planet for fuel to get home.   Like Sonic, this game has a intense sense of speed. A huge variety of enemies, really enjoyable bosses and a surprisingly interesting story (with decent voice acting to boot). It’s everything a fan of platformers could want with two exceptions: the final boss is unfair to the point it belongs in Dark Souls and the story bits are sometimes longer than the gameplay parts.   Playing this on PC, I found the framerate to be capped at 60 (not a problem in a speedy game like this), excellent controller support because no one wants to play fast paced platformers with a keyboard and great sound and art. The music was a throwback to classic 16 bit...
Ronin

Ronin

Having gone a while without writing a review (I’ve been writing for a local paper, so my free time was taken up by a variety of projects), I’ve been itching to get back to playing some games. This year, we’ve had a plethora of great games to pick from ranging from epic RPGs (Witcher 3) to mindless beat-em-ups (Arkham Knight) and even some surprises that seemed to sneak up on us (Mad Max). In between every AAA release is always a few indie games that sprout up. Ronin is one that I had seen on TotalBiscuits YouTube channel, but saw that there was much negativity surrounding the game due to having a lack of graphical options that you usually find in good PC games and for a 30 fps cap. I wanted to offer up a counter (while still agreeing that it’s a fun game).   So first, what is this game? Ronin is a turn based action game. The left stick moves your character, and the right stick pauses the game and draws an arc. This arc will either be white all the way through, showing where you’ll land exactly or it will have red at some point in it. Red means when in combat, you’ll stop at that point, hanging mid air. The various buttons on the controller will be used for things like attacking, throwing your sword or teleporting around. To use these abilities (other than attacking) you have to kill enemies and build up a charge meter. Building it up all the way causes it to empty and gives you a free turn.   The...