Blobcat

Blobcat

Great name, what’s it about? At first glance, you’re looking at a puzzle game where you’re a mouse trying to get around cats and end up in your mouse hole. At second glance that’s exactly what this game is and it does that very very well. You’re going to end up placing arrows, which both mice (yes, plural) and cats will follow. Watch the patterns they walk, figure out where to place the arrows and collect your points. Cute. Is it good? By my estimation, it’s VERY good. The quick gameplay is well suited to the puzzles presented. Each puzzle can be beat using all resources, but that will end up getting you a single star per stage. Since later stages are unlocked via stars, you’re going to want to try and use as few resources as possible to get two and three stars per puzzle. Something worth noting: I was never ever once frusterated while playing. There was no puzzle that needed me to look up help but the game was consistent in the challenges presented. Stars? That kinda sounds like a mobile game! Astute. It is a mobile game, and this is the steam version. I enjoyed playing on Steam but afterwards checked out the touchscreen version. They’re basically identical but much like mini-metro the game is retooled for PC controls. Do not let the mobile origin stop you from playing a great puzzle game. Anything else I should know? Yes, one. The game is quite short. I blazed through the first four stages in around 40 minutes. The whole game is only 100 stages and the...
Mini Metro

Mini Metro

Mini metro is one of those games, if you haven’t played it you probably own it. Either through bundles or steam sales, the game has a huge audience and on the surface it’s understandable why one might overlook it. Any single screenshot looks plain with wide light swaths cut through by a few colorful lines. But what those things represent is so much more and adds up to something very much worth your time. In Mini Metro, you’ll start with three stations that need to be connected. Each station is represented by a shape, most commonly a square, circle, or triangle but also diamonds and stars. Passengers are darker icons that need to be delivered to other stations, as shown by [b]their[/b] shapes (they use the same shapes as the stations).   You connect your stations by drawing a line between them. The various colors represent a ‘track’, a path the train will follow. So you decide which stations connect and how. If a passenger wants to get to a station that isn’t directly on their line, they will be dropped off at a connecting station and transfer to another line.   The challenge comes when new stations pop up. If you don’t have a line free, you’ll need to attach it to an existing line, which places a greater strain for trains on that track. It’s an additional stop, an additional spot to pick people up from or deliver them to and it means passengers have a longer wait.   Every seven days you get an upgrade, usually in the form of a new train and a choice...
Marvel: Future Fight

Marvel: Future Fight

I don’t get to play many mobile games, and those that I do are highly replayable and more often than not are paid apps. Free to play games on mobile devices have me in a ‘alright, let’s see how greedy this game is’ mentality when I play them. That’s why when I come across excellent free to play games like Marvel’s Spider-Man Unlimited I find myself hooked. A few months back, Marvel released ‘Mighty Heroes’, a brawling game with synchronous co-op. It was ok, but it left a distinctive taste in my mouth that it lacked any real strategy. Unlimited had strategy, but lacked the rest of the Marvel universe. Mighty Heroes had the universe, but lacked strategy. Contest of Champions, a fighting game, was good but the story was really really bad. I think Future Fight might be a trinity for me: good gameplay, big universe and a story that isn’t horrible. But how greedy is it?   Like most Marvel games, it uses a fictional element called ISO-8, as well as Gems and Gold (why do heroes need gold? Who knows!) all as currency as well as some new concepts: DNA patterns and SHIELD currency. And of course, as with all mobile games these days, energy that dictates how long you can play the game for. Now with five plus different forms of currency in the game used to increase the effectiveness, level, power and gear of your characters, it seems like this should be a pretty prime target for greed. The thing is, much like my beloved Warframe, it seems (at least with three days of...