Suicide Guy

Suicide Guy

Suicide Guy? So…   Ok let’s set this aside. The game could have been called a number of other, less uncomfortable names. Yes, you’re spending time killing yourself but the reason is you’re trying to wake up from a dream. This game is not enforcing, endorsing or encouraging suicide.     Oh… so I’m dreaming?   Yeah. Your character is a slob who fell asleep drinking a beer. As you began dreaming, your brain noticed the bottle dropping but you can’t get out of the ‘hub’ until you complete a number of other dreams. Each one has you figuring out how you’ll kill yourself to escape the dream, with 25 total dreams in all.     Ok that doesn’t sound so bad. Is it good?   It’s… imaginative. I’d argue it’s good, but as a game it’s not very replayable. The platforming has a weird jiggle when you climb (which you’ll do often), so I doubt people will target it for speed runs. But will you have fun over the 5-6 hours you’ll play? Absolutely.     So what does the game do well?   The game has lots of really great references. Jurassic Park, Mario, Portal, Moby Dick and plenty others. The graphics are well designed (although at first I though the game was an asset flip, due to wide variances in quality), and the sound/music is passable, never being annoying and never being something I could listen to outside this game.     And the bad?   The game has roughly 50% puzzles that have you figuring stuff out, and 50% platforming to a very obvious goal....
Blobcat

Blobcat

Great name, what’s it about? At first glance, you’re looking at a puzzle game where you’re a mouse trying to get around cats and end up in your mouse hole. At second glance that’s exactly what this game is and it does that very very well. You’re going to end up placing arrows, which both mice (yes, plural) and cats will follow. Watch the patterns they walk, figure out where to place the arrows and collect your points. Cute. Is it good? By my estimation, it’s VERY good. The quick gameplay is well suited to the puzzles presented. Each puzzle can be beat using all resources, but that will end up getting you a single star per stage. Since later stages are unlocked via stars, you’re going to want to try and use as few resources as possible to get two and three stars per puzzle. Something worth noting: I was never ever once frusterated while playing. There was no puzzle that needed me to look up help but the game was consistent in the challenges presented. Stars? That kinda sounds like a mobile game! Astute. It is a mobile game, and this is the steam version. I enjoyed playing on Steam but afterwards checked out the touchscreen version. They’re basically identical but much like mini-metro the game is retooled for PC controls. Do not let the mobile origin stop you from playing a great puzzle game. Anything else I should know? Yes, one. The game is quite short. I blazed through the first four stages in around 40 minutes. The whole game is only 100 stages and the...
Super Hot

Super Hot

In a world where shooters are a dime a dozen and unity engine games aren’t always synonymous with quality, it’s nice to have a developer like this put some real time and effort into fine tuning every single aspect of their game until you feel like it’s all one system. If you’re looking for a game where you feel like Neo, you’ve found it.   Super Hot is more puzzle game than action game, where you need to clear a smallish level of all foes before you’re allowed to progress to the next. The core mechanic of the game is that time does not progress unless you move. Well it does but very very slowly, with everything around you happening as though the world is filled with molasses. Of course the moment you start walking or aiming, that all goes away and panic sets in as bullets whiz by your head.   I won’t go into the story, as it’s best to go in blind, but it is something that will likely stick with you after you’re done. The main story is only an hour or two long, but there’s plenty to do in free play, in challenges and just exploring everything the game has to offer. Even if the game isn’t on a sale, it’s certainly worth the full price of admission for all this...
Max: The Curse of Brotherhood

Max: The Curse of Brotherhood

Take one part Pixar, one part Labyrinth, a splash of Mario and a dash of Portal and mix them together. What you’ll find is a surprisingly fun puzzle platformer about a boy saving his little brother, full of heart.   When Max is bothered by his little brother playing with his toys (already, noting our protagonist as a brat), he takes to google (well, they call it ‘Giggle’) and finds a spell to get rid of him. Presto, we’re dragged to another place and a monster is rushing away with our brother. A crazy old woman and lots of goblin looking uglies later, you’re on your way.   The primary way you’ll interact with the game is your magic marker. It gets powered up to be a weapon of sorts, gaining power as you play the game. At first, you can raise platforms of stone. Later you’ll grow plants, move water and even explode things. The powers all combine with each other, in various ways. Cause a plant branch to fall onto a spot where you’ll raise dirt to create a ramp. Or use water to shoot yourself over to a vine.   The game itself isn’t particularly hard but it is fun and if you have a younger player in the home, they’ll enjoy giving their input as well. My daughter even figured out one nasty puzzle before I had noodled it out. The game is never very cheap and goes on sale often. Unless you have something against puzzles or platformers, you really can’t go wrong picking this game...
A Story About My Uncle

A Story About My Uncle

I’ve enjoyed many a game that were short and linear. Portal, Papo and Yo and Grandpa’s Leftovers were all great experiences with each one crafted around a very solid core mechanic. With Portal, we had the eponymous portals. With Papo and Yo, the giant monster switching between rage and peace. With Gandpa’s Leftovers we had the delightful ‘geometry slicing’. Add to that list one ‘A Story About My Uncle’, the best web-slinging game since Spider-Man (and probably the only one not carrying that title).   Beginning with the narrator, a father, telling his daughter a bed-time story we are dragged into a world of wonder located in an ephemeral ‘somewhere’. From caverns to floating islands, ice caves and the uncles cabin, we zip along as the narrator describes for his daughter a grand adventure about searching for his inventor uncle. Of course, needing to navigate this Jim Henson-esque world you need a certain mechanical mobility and to that end you use an energy whip. It delivers you from one solid surface to another. Limited energy keeps you from just staying aloft forever, although upgrades to the gauntlet and other gear enable you to expand your movement repertoire and you’ll need to as late in the game will be some rather devious puzzles (although nothing too strenuous for most gamers).   While the game isn’t all that long (3-6 hours, depending on skill level) and has a very limited cast of characters, it feels very well polished and iterated upon. The puzzles are never unfair, the game never leaving you with the need to know what happens next and aside from...