Overwatch

Overwatch

In 2007 Valve released the Orange Box for PC and consoles. Containing Portal, Half-Life 2 (and expansions) and a game that many had almost forgot was in development: Team Fortress 2. The 50’s americana aesthetic was quite appealing and the fine balance of nine classes was highly successful. Over time, Valve made many decisions that split the community, namely going Free to Play and having a huge amount of non-cosmetic items that highly affected the balance of the game. Blizzard has stepped up to the plate and created a game to fill the niche for people who fell in love with what Team Fortress 2 was, rather than what it is now.   Overwatch consists of eighteen characters divided into four categories: Offense, Defense, Support and Tank. Offense bringing damage down upon your foes, Defense responsible for creating areas of difficulty for your opponents, Support for keeping your team going and Tanks for soaking up the damage dished out from opponents. Each character has their own unique attacks, modes of transport and special abilities resulting in a nightmare of balancing. Twelve maps divided into four groups determine the objectives of each team further adding to the complexity. The result? A magically well balanced game requiring the right combination of player skill, knowledge and teamwork.   Coming from Blizzard means there is a beautiful art design, drawing from anime and comic books as well as popular culture. A diverse selection of race and gender means that there should be a character or two that everyone finds appeals to them. Unlike the Modern Warfare or Battlefield series of games, there are...
Work It: Valve Expands Steam Workshop

Work It: Valve Expands Steam Workshop

Today Valve had posted on the official Workshop page (http://steamcommunity.com/games/SteamWorkshop/announcements/detail/154581565731694927) that they are opening up the ‘monetization’ portion of the workshop.  So far, only Valve has allowed content creators to make money from their hard work. In Dota2, TF2 and CS:GO you’ll find many items that get voted upon and added to the game. Then Valve splits the money made with the content creator.   So far, only Dungeon Defenders: Eternity and Chivalry: Medieval Warfare support this new functionality but you can expect it to expand to other games shortly. Some have stated that this is a bad thing, encouraging people to do shady things to make a quick buck but I think overall this is a great decision. A lot of hard work goes into quality content and with money on the line people will up their game just a little bit. Too often do we see mods fall away and never get released because they lose interest or other things become more important.   Anyway, it should be an exciting few months as games add support for this feature and when possible I’d like to detail how to go about adding to these workshops here on The Genius Inc. I’ll probably up a tutorial or two for CS:GO stickers (which I am familiar with) within the next...